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Author: Stephen Knight

Flashlight Review: Klarus XT2CR & TRS1

Disclaimer This review is of the Klarus XT2CR flashlight and TRS1 remote pressure switch. The Klarus XT2CR was sent to me for an honest review by GearBest. Product page link.  No other payment, or commission was receieved. The TRS1 pressure switch was purchased by myself from liteshop.com.au Construction The Klarus XT line of flashlights is popular with light painting photographers due to the dual tail switch “tactical” user interface. The Klarus XT2CR is a little brother to the XT11GT and XT12GT flashlights, being in an 18650 tube light class (i.e head diameter is same as the body diameter). It uses...

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Flashlight Review: Nitecore P10GT

Disclaimer The Nitecore P10GT flashlight was sent to me for an honest review by FastTech. No other payment was received, and I receive no commission from links or sales. Product page link.  5% off with code: saving Introduction The Nitecore P10GT is a “tactical” 18650 tube light, which has not received as much review attention as some other lights in its class. Time for a review then! Construction The Nitecore P10GT came in a Nitecore branded cardboard box, and contained the flashlight, instructions, warranty card, lanyard, belt clip/holster, tactical/anti-roll ring and spare O-rings. This is a pretty good selection of...

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Flashlight Review: Generic Cheap Zoom Light

Introduction Whether we like to admit it or not, many light painters have purchased cheap zoom lights at some point, before we knew any better. There is no question that it is possible to light paint with very cheap flashlights, but how do these cheap zoom lights compete with higher quality budget flashlights when it comes to value for money? There are many cheap zoom lights available, and the one chosen for this review is produced by a Chinese OEM manufacturer, and is available under lots of different brand names (half of which end with “fire” or “tac”). This...

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Battery Charger Buying Guide

The third and last of my equipment buying guides looks at battery chargers. Along with buying flashlights and batteries, buying a decent charger can be a minefield for those new to light painting art. NiMH chargers NiMH chargers are used to charge rechargeable NiMH AAA, AA, and sometimes C and D batteries. There are two types of NiMH chargers – timer based (dumb) chargers, and smart chargers. Timer based chargers are commonly found for sale in supermarkets, and just run on a timer. This can result in uneven charge, and “cooking” of batteries that have reached full charge, degrading...

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Flashlight Review: Fitorch MR35 (RGBW-UV)

Disclaimer The Fitorch MR35 flashlight was sent to me for an honest review by Banggood. No other payment was received for review, and I receive no commission from links or sales. Product page link  30% off discount code: MR35 Introduction Fitorch are a fairly new brand in the flashlight market. This review is of the Fitorch MR35 which is an 18650 based light, with a 1200 lumen cool white Cree XP-L emitter, red, green, blue (RGB), and ultraviolet (UV) LED emitters. Aside from the Cree XM-L RGBW based Ledlenser P7QC and T2QC, most RGBW lights just have rather dim...

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Battery Safety and Buying Guide

  The second of my buying guides looks at batteries, including li-ion safety. Part three will look at battery chargers. Alkalines and NiMH Most light painter’s first flashlights are based on non-rechargeable Alkaline (1.5V) batteries or rechargeable NiMH (1.2V) batteries. These come in AAA, AA, C, and D sizes. Compared to li-ion batteries, these are generally very safe, and easy to purchase. Alkaline batteries are widely available almost everywhere, but as they not rechargeable, they are quite wasteful. They also loose voltage faster the NiMH batteries, resulting in a faster drop in brightness in direct drive flashlights. Alkaline batteries...

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Flashlight buying guide

Buying a flashlight (torch) for light painting can be a bit of a minefield, especially for those new to the art. Whilst light painting is possible with even the cheapest $2 flashlight, for professional looking results, decent flashlights are an essential. This Flashlight buying guide looks at what options and features you need to consider when purchasing flashlights for light painting. Beam profile Flashlights can have a beam that varies between being a “flooder” (wide angle spill beam beam with less intense hotspot), and “thrower” (narrower spill beam and more intense hotspot). Many flashlights are somewhere in-between. The beam...

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